What Are the Best Non-Surgical Hair Loss Treatments to Use after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Thu 1 Dec 2016

I m 26 years old and i just had a hair transplant and now I m confused that   after  my hair transplant wich treatment should I consider acell ,prp or laser to save my remaining old hair and stop hair and and maintain it thicken it

hairYour hair transplant surgeon should have discussed the progressive nature of androgenic alopecia (genetic balding) with you along with today’s most effective medical hair loss treatments. It’s always best to discuss these concerns with your doctor and you may end up needing a prescription.

While ACell, PRP and Low-Level Laser Therapy have their place in hair restoration, their effects on hair growth remain as yet unproven. Currently, the only clinically proven and FDA approved non-surgical hair loss treatments are Propecia (finasteride) and Rogaine (minoxidil. These drugs when used in combination offer the best chance to retain existing hair and potentially regrow hair that has already been lost.

If you have not already done so, I suggest contacting your hair transplant surgeon for more advice on these excellent hair loss treatments.

David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

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How Soon Can I Do Heavy Weightlifting after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Tue 29 Nov 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Dr. Blake Bloxham, a staff physician from Feller Medical:

When can a follicular unit extraction (FUE) hair transplant patient start heavy weight lifting after his procedure? I’m no weight lifter but I like to stay in shape and push myself when I am working out.
liftingInstructions will vary. It is important to follow your own hair restoration clinic’s “to a T.” However, I think most will probably be in the 10-14 day range. And this is likely when you’ll feel like getting back into it as well.
 
Some light exercising — namely cardio — is usually okay before then, but you do want to be careful building up sweat on the scalp. Especially post-FUE. Remember, you have thousands of little open, healing wound on top, sides, and back of your head. The last thing you want to do is build a very nice warn, sweaty environment for bacteria to thrive in, and risk any damage to the fragile follicles or infection in any of the wounds.
 
Feller Medical
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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
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Top 3 Frequently Asked Hair Loss Questions of the Week

Wed 23 Nov 2016

Balding men and women are perpetually seeking real treatments for their hair loss problem. Below we feature answers to 3 of the most recent frequently asked hair loss and hair restoration related questions.

What’s the Verdict on Laser Therapy for Hair Loss? Whether or not laser therapy works to stop hair loss has been a hot topic on our hair restoration forum. Read this article to understand the debate and draw your own conclusions on whether or not lasers can restore your hair.

Is a Hair Transplant Worth the Money? Today’s surgical hair restoration is a real solution to regrow your own natural hair in completely bald areas. Read this article and decide for yourself whether or not hair transplantation is worth the time and money.

If Working Out Increases Testosterone – Does it Accelerate Hair Loss? Read this article to learn whether or not weight lifting and working out can accelerate hair loss.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Coalition Hair Transplant Surgeon Dr. David Josephitis Discusses the WAW Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) Tool

Tue 22 Nov 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. David Josephitis:

What exactly is a WAW FUE device and how does it differ from other tools or techniques?

Dr_Josephitas_protraitThe WAW FUE is the device that we are currently using for over 90% of the follicular unit extraction cases at Shapiro Medical Group. We have been using it now for almost a year and have been very happy with the quality of the grafts and the patient results.

When it comes to FUE devices, they can basically be broken down into manual and motorized systems. Within those types they are also broken down into sharp or blunt – tipped punches.
If you are familiar with the devices, a common sharp punch is made by Cole and a common blunt is made by Harris SAFE. I have tried all of these devices and they all have different pros and cons. The WAW is somewhat of a combination of the blunt and sharp. The punch is actually a flat surface so that it actually cuts through the surface as a sharp punch does, but also glides easily past the follicles like the blunt punch does. The punch also uses oscillation and not rotation, so it is much gentler during the deeper dissection.

Hair Loss, Hair Restoration Surgery and the Phenomenon of ‘Hair Greed’

Thu 17 Nov 2016

The following response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”:

Should I get a hair transplant touch-up now and wear my hair how I like it or wait years for my hair to bald more then go for a larger session? I’m so close to having my dream hairline.

Hair greed is a very real phenomenon. And those of us who have sustained hair loss “and” also benefited from good results from hair restoration surgery can all relate to this.

We can get caught up in the mind frame of “how can this be better?” when most of the time things are just fine. What I mean by this is having our hairline back and decent illusionary coverage. Yet it’s very easy to start thinking, “If I could only get this hair more dense or my hairline lowered, I would be happy”.

Now don’t get me wrong, most of us will need more than one procedure and there is nothing wrong with that. But what I am talking about is pushing the limit beyond our donor resources and not taking into account future balding especially when it’s clearly in our cards to lose more. Or, could I be doing more damage than good to continue adding grafts to the same zone?

Some of us tend to want a perfect hairline or density that we had when we were in our teens. In my opinion, it’s not necessary to look spectacular.

How Long Does It Take for a Hair to Fully Mature from the Time It Sprouts after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Tue 15 Nov 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Dr. Blake Bloxham, a staff physician from Feller Medical:

Approximately how long does it take for a single hair to fully mature from the day it sprouts out of the skin, to the day it has fully matured. Are we talking 4 weeks or so, or many months?

timeInteresting question. So you’re asking: How long does it take for a single hair to fully mature from the day it sprouts to the day it’s fully matured? I’ll start by giving you my favorite answer in all of medicine: it depends. Annoying, right? But please, do read on …

So let’s take a step back and look not at the hairs maturing, but the follicles that produce the hairs maturing — and how this affects the maturation of the hair.

There is a specific reason why most transplanted follicles don’t start growing hair until 3 months after surgical hair restoration. When follicles “rest” and don’t grow hair, they are said to be in the “telogen” phase. Basically, follicles stop functioning in this stage and don’t produce hairs. Telogen can occur for a variety of reasons: as part of a normal hair cycle, as the permanent end result of androgenic alopecia, or as part of post-surgical trauma. But regardless of why it happens, it usually lasts 3-4 months.

Is Hair Transplant Surgery Painful?

Mon 7 Nov 2016

In addition to wanting to know the final results of a state of the art hair transplant procedure will be natural, dense, and undetectable – some hair loss patients, especially those with a low tolerance for pain are concerned about the amount of pain they’ll experience during the actual procedure. Are hair transplants painful? How much pain is experienced during the surgical hair restoration procedure? How about over the next couple of days/weeks while the wounds are healing?

To learn more about the pain one can experience during hair transplant surgery and while healing, visit “Pain Levels in Hair Transplant Surgery“. You are encouraged to participate in this discussion by sharing your experience.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Watch hair transplant videos  on YouTube

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Dr. William Lindsey Demonstrates How to Perform Scalp Stretching Exercises for Hair Transplant Surgery

Sat 5 Nov 2016

The following video was posted to our hair loss forum by Coalition Hair Transplant Surgeon Dr. William Lindsey:

This video is long overdue. Finally, after two guys emailed and one called this week about how I want them to stretch. Here’s what I prefer. Obviously every hair restoration physician thinks his/her way is best so check with your doctor. But if you are coming to me, this is what to do.

Dr. William Lindsey
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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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Medical Treatments and Other Options For Hair loss

Tue 1 Nov 2016

This insightful article was written by  Dr. Michael Meshkin  of Newport Beach, CA who is one of our recommended hair restoration physicians.

Finasteride (Propecia), an oral medication for hair loss  available by prescription only, has been introduced to the market in the past decade. Finasteride is approved only for use by men. Through scientific studies, it has been shown to regrow hair in some men and stop hair loss in an even higher percentage. Propecia works by decreasing the formation of DHT (dihydrotestosterone), a hormone responsible in large for male pattern  baldness  while not reducing testosterone, the overall male hormone responsible for masculinity. Therefore, any side effects that may involve male sexual function are mild and occur in less than 2% of all patients. Finasteride has been available for over 10 years and has been shown to be somewhat safe and effective.

Finasteride (Propecia) works best for early and moderate hair loss, but it may also help patients with more advanced balding to preserve their remaining hair, and its use is suggested by hair restoration surgeons as an effective medication to slow down or reverse male pattern baldness in many men. It is often used as a complimentary treatment for hair transplant patients.

How Effective Is Hair Transplant Strip Scar Revision with FUE?

Tue 1 Nov 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

On a scale of 1 to 10 (1 being essentially useless, 5 being hit or miss, 10 being miracle solution), would you rate the effectiveness of having follicular unit extraction (FUE) hair transplantation into the hair transplant scar that is visible after a strip procedure?

Also, does FUE-into-scar allow someone to wear their hair shorter on the sides? For example, if someone can get away with a #4 guard with their scar, could a procedure such as this allow them to get away with a #3 guard?

Dr. CharlesPlacing FUE grafts into scar tissue is much less predictable than grafting into virgin scalp tissue. I have had some remarkable cases and also some that did not take as well. A lot depends on the quality of the patient’s hair.

Thinner/finer hairs generally have a lower survival rate compared to medium and coarse hair types.

Dr. Glenn Charles
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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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