I’ve been battling excessive hair shedding for over a year now. Once I started noticing shedding, I began taking Biotin and Saw Palmetto supplements for nearly the duration of the year with little (if any) results. For the past few weeks I’ve also been trying “Regenepure DR” shampoo. At the moment I don’t see this curbing my hair shedding either (although it’s likely too early to tell).

My hair loss seems usual to me as my back crown and hairline are relatively intact. The top of my head is what continues to shed, and has gotten to the point where it’s very noticeably patchy and quickly becoming unmanageable.

I considered giving Rogaine Foam a try but I’m worried about any side effects, and that the initial shed may leave me with little hair left. I’m also considering taking 1mg daily of Firide (finasteride from Thailand). Is this an effective treatment? Is there anything I should steer clear from? It would be great if anyone could give me suggestions to set me on a better path.

hair-loss-tipsI suggest that the first thing you do is consult with a dermatologist or hair restoration physician. You’ll want to determine if you are experiencing the early stages of androgenic alopecia (genetic hair loss). If so, your physician may recommend starting both Propecia (finasteride) and Rogaine (minoxidi). The two drugs are the only clinically proven and FDA approved medical hair loss treatments for male pattern baldness.

This below question was asked by a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums and answered by recommended hair restoration surgeon Dr. Ali Emre Karadeniz.

After a hair transplant, when the hair starts to sprout at 3 months, will the hair come out of the skin all at once? Like all the grafts that were planted? Or, will they come out little by little and not at once.

I had read somewhere that all the follicular units that are viable and can grow hair, sprout at once between 3 and 4 months post-op and after that, it’s basically thickening and maturing.

Dr_Kardeniz_PhotoIt is basic information, but there is no harm in repeating that follicles are in asynchrony at the time of extraction, thus starting to grow at different times after hair transplantation.

They do not grow all at once at 3-4 months although there is a dominance of hair growth either at 5-7 or 8-10 months. Depending on the biology of each patient, totally new hairs may sprout after 12 months.

Dr. Ali Emre Karadeniz
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David (TakingThePlunge)
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

 

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This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

After wearing my hair in tight braids for years, I now suffer from traction alopecia. I’m wondering, can this be repaired with hair transplant surgery?

traction alopecia before and afterTraction alopecia is defined as a focal (concentrated in one location and non-patterned), non-scarring type of alopecia. It’s generally caused by a prolonged period of pulling – “traction” – on hair follicles. It’s most commonly seen in individuals who wear their hair in tight braids for long periods of time, or individuals who wrap their hair in tight dressings for cultural or religion regions. These situations both put excessive strain on the follicles and cause hair loss over time.

Fortunately, traction alopecia can be repaired with hair transplant surgery. In fact, it usually responds very well to hair transplantation. Interested in what can be achieved with hair transplantation in patients with traction alopecia? If so, please review this excellent case presented by recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Tejinder Bhatti: 2,453 Grafts for a Traction Alopecia patient. 

Those interested in a similar repair may benefit from reviewing our recommended hair transplant surgeons and considering a consultation.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

Several months ago, I underwent Follicular Unit Strip Surgery (FUSS). I’m pleased with the results so far, but worried about the strip scar. How long should I wait before considering revision of my hair transplant strip scar?

FUT staplesMuch like the results of the hair transplant itself, the strip scar takes around 12 months to fully mature and develop. The scar goes through a series of healing phases. During the earlier healing phases, the scar often appears raw and red, and patients assume it won’t heal well. This often is not the case, and the scar simply needs more time to heal.

By month 12, it should be as flat and narrow as it is going to be; at this point, patients can assess the scar and determine if it needs revision. While strip surgery normally leaves a fairly thin and manageable scar, healing is variable and some patients may scar regardless of how well the incision is closed.

Those considering scar revision should consult with an experienced hair transplant surgeon to discuss their options.

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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I recently dyed my hair a darker color. After the color treatment, however, it looks like I’m losing my hair! Can hair dye cause hair loss? Is it temporary? Any other explanations for what’s going on?

hair dyeHair dyes normally cause alopecia via structural damage to the hair shaft – also known as trichorrexia nodosa. This would manifest as shorter “broken hairs” – in the shower, sink, on the pillow, etc – without a bulb at the end, or the appearance of a variety of small, thick hairs growing near the scalp surface.

Some people have a genetic predisposition to shaft breakage that is “set off” by a harsh environmental factor – brushing, chemical dyes, harsh shampoos, etc. This could be the case here.

While hair loss from harsh dye is possible, there may be another explanation: a starker contrast between scalp color/tone and hair shaft color/tone always creates a “thinning” appearance. This is the reason why Caucasian men with lighter hair can undergo hair transplantation at lower densities and still achieve good results. It’s possible that you dyed the hair darker and it now simply looks thinner because of the more obvious contrast with your scalp.

If it is related to trichorrexia, it should naturally reverse itself; if it is related to contrast, you should see a difference after the hair grows out.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Dr_Kardeniz_PhotoOur hair restoration community recommend only the best hair transplant surgeons. Therefore, we are pleased to announce that Dr. Ali Emre Karadeniz of Istanbul, Turkey has been approved for recommendation on the Hair Transplant Network. To see how we recommend hair restoration physicians, click here.

Dr. Karadeniz, his technique and results were carefully reviewed by our hair restoration forum and social community in consideration for recommendation. Because the majority of feedback we received from patients, forum members and physicians have been positive, Dr. Karadeniz was approved by the community for recommendation.

To view Dr. Karadeniz’s recommendation profile, click here. To see what our members are saying, visit the “Potential Recommendation of Dr. Ali Emre Karadeniz of Istanbul, Turkey“.

Thanks to everyone who provided their valuable input regarding Dr. Karadeniz’s potential recommendation. You are encouraged to congratulate him by clicking on his featured potential inclusion topic above.

For hair loss sufferers considering hair transplant surgery in Turkey and beyond, we strongly encourage you to consult with and consider Dr. Karadeniz for your hair transplant procedure.

Onwards and Upwards,

Pat, Bill, Dave and Blake – The Hair Restoration Team for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q & A Blog and the Hair Restoration Forum and Social Community

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This insightful article was written by hair loss physician Dr. Jean Devroye, who is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

Dr_Devroye_photoSynopsis
Hair transplantation at the level of the vertex is not an easy to manage technique. This article, after having revised the notions of anatomy, describes the strategic stakes which are necessary to face. It also gives numerous details on the technique to implement in order to obtain the most natural result possible and which also gives the best possible apparent density.

Introduction
The vertex is a complex zone. The hairs are arranged in a radial way. It is of course subject to more or less complete baldness. The progression of this is mostly eccentric, starting from the center and evolving more or less quickly towards the periphery.

It is no easy task to treat the vertex for several reasons that will be developed hereunder.

We are often in an uncertain situation, facing a progression the outcome of which we do not know and the hair loss is often widespread. The thinning often includes the frontal zone, the midscalp and the vertex. It is essential to take into account the Donor-Recipient Area Ratio. Unfortunately this ratio is transformational. It’s never easy to choose the best strategy knowing the vertex is a secondary zone by comparison with the anterior and median zones.

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums: 

I’m interested in consulting with several doctors about hair transplant surgery. Some of these doctors charge a consultation fee while others do not. Is there normally a fee for a hair transplant consultation?

consultationThe complicated answer to this question is: it depends.

Each hair transplant surgeon runs his or her practice in a unique manner. Some believe in offering free consultations. Others may need to charge a small fee in order to pay office rent and employee salaries. Others may have offered free consultations in the past, but became overwhelmed and instituted a small fee in order to balance time spent consulting and time spent operating.

I think the fee aspect sometimes creates confusion for potential hair transplant patients. Some believe doctors charging a fee are doing so to increase profits; others think offering “free consultations” may be a sales tactic to book procedures. In my opinion, neither is probably true. It likely boils down to personal philosophy, time management, and the costs of operating a medical/surgical practice.

This common question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I try to “track” my hair loss by taking a lot of pictures of my scalp from different angles. However, it looks different in almost every picture I take. Sometimes, it looks thicker and the loss isn’t very noticeable; other times, it looks very thin! Why does this happen? Why does my hair loss look different in different pictures?

cameraThe differing appearance of your hair loss is likely caused by photographs taken under different conditions. It may seem trivial, but changing the lighting, distance, or angle of an image can drastically change the appearance of hair loss. Using a flash from certain angles may create a variety of shadows on the scalp and make the hair appear thicker. Conversely, using the flash from other angles – particularly “straight on” – may actually cause the hair to appear thinner. Natural light generally causes the hair to look thinner than artificial lighting, and pictures taken outside will appear thinner than those taken inside. This is only a few examples of why hair loss looks different in certain pictures.

It’s also why we advocate for evaluating both hair loss and post-hair transplant images under standardized conditions. If you are going to monitor your hair loss with pictures, make sure to take each photo under the same circumstances. Pick a spot, and take the picture from the same angle, at the same distance, during the same time each day. This way, the images will be as similar as possible and any difference can likely be attributed to progressive loss.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

Several years ago, I underwent Follicular Unit Strip Surgery (FUSS). The result is good, but the strip scar is noticeable when my hair is trimmed short. I’m interested in “buzzing” my hair shorter on the sides, and would like to revise the scar. Is it possible to revise or camouflage my hair transplant scar with Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) grafts?

FUE scar repairCamouflaging a strip scar with FUE grafts is an option. Unfortunately, FUE grafting into strip scarring isn’t always reliable. Scar tissue is dense, tortuous, and avascular (no blood supply). This makes growth rates highly variable. If your scar is thick and raised, you may have low blood supply in the region. This could really affect growth. If you can, consult with one of our recommended hair restoration physicians. This will help clarify the level of scarring and how well grafts could grow in the tissue.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

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