The following thorough response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

From the safe zone of head, how many grafts would be available total for the average male? How about just multiple sessions of follicular unit extraction (FUE)?

fue-donorA very general response for the average individual would be 5,000 – 7,000 grafts for follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) and add another 2,000 if it is FUE.

We have to consider that donor level density, size of the donor regions, and competence of the hair restoration physician all impact these numbers.

For FUE only, this would really depend on the individual’s overall scalp density. Why? Because let’s say one individual has average density, then the average might be 6,000 -8,000 utilizing all of the scalp donor zones including the sides and parietal zones.

If you go much higher than that, then the donor zones can potentially begin to appear thin and over-harvested especially if the scalp is buzzed down. But if the individual had upper end density levels, then 8,000 plus is not out of the question.

Gillenator
Supporting Hair Restoration Physicians: Dr. Glenn Charles, Boca Raton, FL – Dr. Jerry Cooley, Charlotte, NC – Dr. Jim Harris, Denver, CO – Dr. Robert True & Dr. Robert Dorin, New York, NY

—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Shapiro Medical:

I want to fix my thinning hair with hair transplant surgery. However, I’ve heard transplanting into thinning areas (opposed to completely bald scalp) can cause my native (non-transplanted) hair to fall out or undergo “shock loss.” Is this true? Is shock loss permanent? Am I still a transplant candidate?

thinning hairPatients usually get transplants for one of two reasons. Some have very thin or bald areas and transplant into those areas to replace what they have lost. Others, like yourself have thinning, but may still be able to somewhat conceal that loss with existing hair. The latter will get a transplant because they don’t want to be completely bald before they do anything about their hair loss. Both types are great candidates for surgery. The only issue with patients like yourself with native hair still in the area that is to be worked on, is that it is indeed more sensitive to “shock loss.” Thankfully men seem less sensitive to this phenomenon than women and rarely lose a large amount of hair. This shock loss usually resolves after a few months and grows back with your transplanted hair. Some of the finer hairs that were already on their way out may not return, but in the end, they most likely did not impact the overall density anyway.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Brenton, Patient Advocate for recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Parsa Mohebi:

I would like to know if anyone can give me a rough idea from all the hair restoration physicians certified here, how many doctors advise for a full head shampoo like normally one does while having a shower? How many doctors here advise a full normal head shampoo after 10 days of having a hair transplant ?

imagesAt the office of recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Parsa Mohebi, we advise that it’s safe to use regular shampoo and wash both the recipient area and donor area thoroughly as you did prior to surgery after day 5.

There are always varying answers on here by different people/doctors and some tend to be much conservative, but by day 10 you are definitely safe to do this. I think everyone will be able to agree on that.

Brenton – Patient Advocate for Dr. Parsa Mohebi
—-

David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: hair loss, ,

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

The top of my scalp seems to be pretty tight. Would this tightness be a problem for hair transplant surgery?

Dr. CharlesI have had patients that had tight scalps with very little elasticity who I recommended we try follicular unit extraction (FUE) and got good results.

The best way to determine if your scalp is too tight for follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) is to visit a hair restoration physician. Sometimes a patient will describe their scalp as being very tight and upon physical examination the scalp has good elasticity.

Dr. Glenn Charles

—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , , , , ,

This question, asked by a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a representative for Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. H. Rahal:

I’m undergoing hair transplant surgery next month. The clinic said to stop minoxidil (Rogaine) one month before the procedure. Why do I need to stop the medication? Is one month before surgery the recommended time period for stopping minoxidil?

RogaineRogaine/Minoxidil promotes blood circulation and flow to the scalp (to promote healthy hair growth to your native hairs). We ask that you stop using it a month prior to your procedure to minimize bleeding on the day of your procedure. Since we’re making several hundreds to thousands of incisions to our recipient area, we don’t want you to bleed any more than you need to. In addition, it makes it easier to continue to make the incisions during the procedure and allows for easier implanting.

-Robert, Senior Patient Adviser
______________
Blake Bloxham – formerly “Future_HT_Doc”

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , , hair transplant, ,

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I’ve read about females using spironolactone for hair loss. Can men use this medication as well? Any side effects?

Spironolactone-Bottle-SandozSpironolactone is a serious medication. It isn’t recommended in male hair loss sufferers for two reasons:

1) It’s properties as a diuretic (“water pill”). Spironolactone (Aldactone) causes significant reductions in blood pressure, dehydration, and high potassium levels (hyperkalemia). For those who don’t need lower blood pressure or a reduction in body fluid, these are serious side effects. These effects are lessened when used as a topical treatment. However, this is still an issue for men because …

2) Spironolactone’s anti-androgen properties. It may halt the androgenic alopecia process at the scalp, but it also blocks androgen hormone activity all over the body. This means spironolactone will halt and possibly reverse hair loss, but it may also cause other “feminizing” effects like breast development, loss of body hair, and fat re-distribution. This probably isn’t a big deal for females, but male patients may find it concerning.
______________
Blake Bloxham – formerly “Future_HT_Doc”

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: , , hair loss, ,

kytheraLast week, Kythera pharmaceuticals purchased the rights to “setipriprant,” a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) drug for the treatment of hair loss.

The PGD2 theory of hair loss was initially proposed by Dr. George Cotsarelis at the University of Pennsylvania in 2012. Cotsarelis and his team found elevated PGD2 levels in bald scalp compared to non-balding scalp. Cotsarelis believed this finding demonstrated a connection between PGD2 and hair loss, and began devising treatments for PGD2 enzyme blockers, PGD2 receptor blockers, and direct PGD2 blockers.

Work on PGD2 treatments remained quiet over the next few years. Kythera changed this last week when they announced the purchase of the setipriprant drug, a blocker – or antagonist – of the PGD2 receptor, and the intellectual work of Cotsarelis.

According to Kythera:

“The University of Pennsylvania’s discovery and associated intellectual property assets, combined with access to the PGD2 antagonist setipiprant, provide KYTHERA a strong foundation for this novel approach to hair loss,” said Frederick Beddingfield, III, M.D., Ph.D., KYTHERA’s Chief Medical Officer. “These observations are potentially the most innovative new thinking in hair loss over the last two decades. Setipiprant is believed to directly affect this hair loss pathway, and our own preclinical and in vitro human hair models confirmed this effect. It is a well-characterized molecule with a large safety database and we believe we can quickly initiate a development program to study it in hair loss. Putting these two pieces of the puzzle together is ideal and represents an example of our approach to scientifically sound and efficient drug development.” 

This below response from our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums was written by recommended hair restoration surgeon Dr. Ali Emre Karadeniz.

I had follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) at the hairline two years ago. I’m in consultations to get a 2nd pass for more density (follicular unit extraction this time). I have curly hair.

In one of my recent chats with a hair transplant surgeon, I was inquiring about the higher risk of transection during graft extraction on curly hair. He claims that transection does not result in a dead graft, just one that cannot be used in the current session. The root remains unharmed and will grow a new hair. How true is this?

Obviously, it’s possible for a root to be accidentally severed, but is it likely since the root is so tiny?

Dr_Kardeniz_PhotoThe fate of a totally transacted graft is not clear, however I don’t think we should be very optimistic about it. A partially transected graft, that is a graft with an intact follicle and transected follicle(s) beside it however, is different.

I am currently on a scientific study that has currently shown me that at least half of these transected follicles beside an intact follicle can yield a fully grown hair (at the recipient area). I don’t know what happens at the donor area. Further studies are of course necessary.

This question, asked by a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by “Garageland” – a clinic representative for Coalition hair transplant surgeons Dr. Victor Hasson and Dr. Jerry Wong.

It’s been almost 5 years since I had my follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) surgery. I still think it was one of the best decisions of my life. I never stress about my hair anymore as compared to the pre-op days when I looked in the mirror constantly worrying.

That said, if there’s an opportunity to improve my hair transplant I want to know about it. I’ve come across talk about “Ultra Refined Grafting”. Is that a recent enhancement? I’m wondering if it’s possible to add density into my transplanted area.

0_6181Sure it’s possible to go into the same areas of transplanted hair to add further density, as long as the clinic is experienced. Take my case as an example. I had a further hair restoration session at the end of 2013 to add density into the frontal third. This has grown in very well despite it being the fifth time work has been carried out in this area and that includes three sessions of mini and micro grafts which caused a significant amount of scar tissue, pitting and ridging.

Of course there are factors involved that need to be judged on a case by case basis. It is not so much the implanting that is the key here, it is the incisions which you need to make sure are part of the surgeon’s role.

This question, from a member of our hair losssocial community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

Can anyone wear their hair short after a hair transplant? It seems a lot of people who have had hair transplants wear their hair long. A lot of what I see is a curtain of hair or come over look.

Dr. CharlesIt really depends on the patient’s current hair situation heading into the procedure, what they feel comfortable with and if they intend on trying to camouflage the hair restoration post-op  as much as possible.

Some patients are lucky and work from home, can take time off work or can wear a hat for 7-10 days.

Dr. Glenn Charles
—-

David (TakingThePlunge)

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , ,

Next Page »