Dealing with Anxiety Worrying about the Final Hair Transplant Result

Tue 23 Aug 2016

hair loss family treeUndergoing ]hair transplant surgery is a major decision and should be carefully considered only after extensive research and exploring the benefits, limitations, and potential risks of surgery. While today’s state of the art hair restoration procedures are minimally invasive and produce excellent results in the hands of a skilled physician, it’s only natural for patients to experience a little anxiety and nerves regarding the actual procedure and how the final result will appear.

What will the final result look like? Will it be undetectable to my friends, family, and co-workers? Will it be natural looking? Will my hair be as thick and dense as it was before any hair loss? These questions and doubts race through patient’s minds not only before the procedure, but sometimes after.

Recently, forum member “Jjarden” had undergone hair transplant surgery but has some concerns about how the final result will appear. To learn what to expect from hair restoration surgery prior and after surgery visit “Very Nervous about the End Result“. You are encouraged to share your experience and offer your input.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Is It Safe to Chemically Straighten Hair 6 Months after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Sun 21 Aug 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. David Josephitis

I hate my curly hair, and I got this hair transplant with the hope to have a decent straight haircut like I did a few years ago. I know some products are harsh on the scalp (I’ll avoid them) and that straightening causes some hairs to break (that’s okay).

The idea to have my first few hairs grow even frizzier than the others doesn’t appeal to me at all. My very first idea is to straighten all of that as soon as the density is acceptable, if my HT was a decent success, by month 6 or 7.

What’s your take on this?

Dr_Josephitas_protraitYou will want to be careful when using chemical or physical straighteners or dyes for that matter soon after a hair transplant. The concern of course, is that you will damage the skin and/or hair and ultimately get a poor result.

It is perfectly safe though to treat transplanted hair once it is fully mature. The hair should be just as strong and durable as native hair. Some people’s hair grows faster than others, so it is really a matter of how quickly your transplant has grown out. At 6 months the transplant may be ready to straighten, or it may still be too early. Early and young transplanted hair appears finer and thinner than fully grown mature hair. If you are unsure if the hair is mature, it might be a good idea to check with your hair restoration physician.

Do All Hair Transplant Patients Have an ‘Ugly Duckling’ Stage?

Wed 17 Aug 2016

This hair restoration question was answered by hair loss forum member “ArochaHair”, online representative for Coalition physician Dr. Bernardino Arocha

I have read about the “ugly duckling stage” in several hair transplant patient experiences. It seems that during the recovery process most people lose the hair that is grafted area initially and also can lose some native hair due to shock loss. Does this occur in all cases or is it more of a random event? Is it a bad sign if the implanted hairs do not fall out?

Personally I am not too worried about the ugly duckling stage aside from residual pinkness/redness from the implants. I have shaved/buzzed my head for an 8 month period in the path to a very low grade, so it is something I would be able to not see as too big of a deal, but I am interested if this stage is something that everyone experiences.

uglyducklingNot everyone sheds after their hair transplant but it is something to be expected. If it doesn’t happen then consider yourself among the lucky few but it does not mean that something is wrong. The exception to this is if you are too careful with the grafts. Sometimes patients can be so paranoid that they will cause damage to their new grafts that they will refuse to touch them, or when they do, they do so with the slightest touch. This can in some cases cause problems down the road.

Can I Shave My Head 3 Weeks after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Wed 10 Aug 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. David Josephitis

Almost 3 weeks post op follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) and some of the newly implanted hairs have started shedding as expected, but there are still a few sticking around and it (unsurprisingly) looks a bit ridiculous.

Is there any harm at all in shaving them so it doesn’t look so bizarre? Especially given that they’ll probably fall out within the next month anyway.

My only concerns are:

– Shaving the new hairs will upset them in some way
– Shaving them will take them longer to fall out (and enter the resting phase)

I’m certainly not going to pluck them or anything like that.

Three weeks after hair transplant surgery the grafts are safely secured and there is very little risk to losing any. There is really no concern to getting a haircut at this point. I would advise not to shave the hair very close to the scalp as there may be a possibility that you could cut or injure the newly healed scalp. This could lead to infections. Also too closely cropped hair might predispose someone to getting ingrown hairs which could be tender and also might become inflamed.

The best bet would be too use some sort of guard on your trimmer and make everything even. This would not harm the grafts and give a nice and even look.

Can Dieting Affect the Outcome of a Hair Transplant?

Tue 9 Aug 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Feller Medical:

Is it true that dieting can damage a hair transplant?

DietLong story short, your diet would have to be so extreme that you were truly nutrient deficient to make a real difference in hair quality. In most normal diets — even intense ones — you shouldn’t really get to this point.

What’s more, any changes that you could potentially have in transplanted follicles would reverse. These guys are strong, and really don’t follow the rules when it comes to hair loss. This is why we use them specifically!

If you’re really concerned, things like daily multi-vitamins and regular amounts of proteins, “good fats,” etc would be good to supplement during your dieting. But I still think you’ll be okay regardless.

Feller Medical
—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

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Potential Elongated and Permanent Side Effects of Propecia?

Thu 4 Aug 2016

Rogaine PropeciaFinasteride (the active ingredient found in Propecia) is a proven antiandrogen, blocking DHT and slowing down, stopping and even reversing hair loss in many men. Unfortunately, no effective drug is without the possibility of side effects.

While the known side effects have been reported and published on the Propecia website for years, recent findings suggest the very rare possibility of elongated side effects exist even after stopping treatment. This includes continued erectile dysfunction and even male breast cancer.  This is referred to as post-finasteride syndrome.

While the above sounds scary, many would argue that the chance of being struck by lightning is greater than the possibility of developing breast cancer by using Propecia. Additionally, continued erectile dysfunction after stopping Propecia were reported by consumers, which doesn’t constitute as clinical evidence.

To discuss these new safety findings by the MHRA on our discussion forum, visit “MHRA Drug Safety Update on Propecia“. You are encouraged to offer your input and personal experiences with Propecia.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Why Using Minimally Invasive Tools are Critical in Hair Transplant Surgery

Wed 3 Aug 2016

While most hair transplant patients are concerned about the final results, understanding how to achieve them is crucial in obtaining the densest and most natural looking head of hair.

Today’s revolutionary ultra refined tools and techniques allow top hair restoration physicians to perform large densely packed sessions and provide their patients with a full looking head of hair in only one or two procedures. Minimally invasive tools allow hair transplant surgeons to make tiny incisions in balding areas to maximize hair density and minimize trauma to the scalp.

Recently, forum member “BleachCola12” started a topic to discuss the size of the tools physicians use and consider minimally invasive. Do the sizes vary amongst physicians or according to each patient? What about the size of each graft? To learn about today’s minimally invasive tools and their sizes, visit “What Size Tools to Top Doctors Use to Make Incisions?” You are encouraged to participate in this discussion by offering your input.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Are Saunas, Hot Tubs and Swimming Pools Safe Two Weeks after Hair Transplant Surgery?

Wed 3 Aug 2016

The following response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

I am planning on spending my recovery time from my follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) at a resort, relaxing while away from work. The plan is to take the vacation 2 days after my sutures come out. I am obviously going to keep my head covered at all times and avoid all sunlight on my head. I also have no intention of submerging my head at all in the pool or hot tub.

My plan is to spend some time in the hot tub (without submerging my head), spend some time wading in the pool (with hat and without submerging my head) and possibly spend some time sweating in the sauna. I may also swim in the ocean and have been told by a doctor that the ocean saltwater may actually be “good” for my head at this point.

Anyone have any thoughts on this type of stuff so soon after hair transplant surgery? Thinking of how this might affect either the recipient area or the scar (don’t want it to stretch).

hot_tubEven with post-op care most hair restoration physicians will not want the area subject to extreme swings in temp. And even though your head will not be submerged, the rest of the body’s temp would be increased including the blood supply that runs to the scalp.

Hair Transplant Videos Featuring Interviews with Coalition Member Dr. Timothy Carman

Mon 1 Aug 2016

Coalition member Dr. Timothy Carman  not only performs world class hair transplants with excellent results; his dedication to patient care is second to none.   In his spare time, you will find Dr. Carman interacting and sharing his expertise with hair loss sufferers on our hair restoration forum.

We  uploaded  a series of hair transplant video interviews on  YouTube  featuring  Dr. Timothy Carman.   To learn more about Dr. Carman, his skill, experience, and  philosophy on patient care, visit “Hair Transplant Video Interviews with Dr. Carman“.

To see all of our hair transplant videos, visit our Hair Transplant Video Channel on YouTube.

Below, we’ve embedded a few of the video interviews with Dr. Carman for your viewing pleasure.   We welcome your input on these videos.

Selecting a Quality Hair Transplant Physician by Dr. Timothy Carman

Addressing a Patient’s Hair Restoration Needs by Dr. Timothy Carman

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Beware of Technician Run Follicular Unit Extraction Hair Transplant Clinics

Mon 1 Aug 2016

The following hair restoration article was written by Dr. Steven Gabel of Hillsboro, OR who is an elite member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

0_4069I recently had a consultation with a hair transplant patient who said he had 1000 graft follicular unit extraction (FUE) performed by a “specialized” technician (he had only 1 person do the entire case from start to finish in 4 hours) who traveled to his physician’s clinic to perform the case. The physician “approved” the design and was not seen until the end when he asked if everything went well. The patient’s result: no growth after 18 months. He honestly cannot decipher if he had a single graft that actually grew.

There are many reasons why this type of hair restoration practice is highly unethical: as mentioned, many states do have laws which limit an “incision” to a physician. In my opinion, an incision can be either a linear incision or a punch incision – each is scoring the skin and the blade (straight or round) is going deep to the epidermis. Secondly, the results from many of these clinics are horrible: no hair growth, and the hairline design is poorly planned and unnatural. And last, the donor hair is a priceless area on the scalp – once the donor hair is exhausted, at this stage in technology, we don’t have any more sources of hair so each follicle needs to be utilized in the best way possible.