Does a Hair Transplant Grow in the Same Direction as Natural Hair?

Wed 27 Jul 2016

I am curious if transplanted hair grows different than natural hair. My hair has always been styled forward, even when I had a full head of hair. I am wondering if I did a transplant with a no-shave method, I would be able to hide the new implanted areas with the current natural hair…and if that new hair would start growing in a similar pattern to my current hair.

hair_transplant_step_9Whether or not you’ll be able to adequately conceal your hair transplant with your existing hair depends to a large degree on how much existing hair you have. I had two non-shave transplants. With the first I had very little existing hair in the recipient area so was not able to conceal it well during the healing and initial hair growth stages. When I had my second hair transplant a year later, I had a lot more hair to cover up the work.

In response to the second part of your question, your hair restoration physician will create the recipient site incisions in such a way as to mimic the direction of growth of your natural hair.

David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

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Restoring Dense Hairlines in Young Patients for Religious Reasons?

Mon 25 Jul 2016

The controversial topic of dense packing a large amount of follicular units into a young hair transplant patient’s hairline has been discussed in great deal on our hair restoration forum. The additional risks of further hair loss in young men and a limited donor hair supply sometimes make transplanting too many grafts into the hairline impossible without risking the possibility of an unnatural looking hair loss pattern in the future. While dense packing the hairline sounds good short term, is it responsible for hair replacement surgeons to reproduce a patient’s youthful hairline? Are there any exceptions to the above rule? What about for religious reasons?

New forum member “MrCool20” started a topic to discuss the possibility of restoring his youthful hairline with hair transplant surgery for religious reasons. To learn when it may or may not be appropriate to re-create a natural, dense looking hairline, visit “Hair Transplant for Religious Reasons“. You are encouraged to offer your input on this topic.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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How Common Is Shock Loss in Female Hair Transplant Patients?

Sat 23 Jul 2016

The following response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

I am a 32 year old woman with bald temples and a receding frontal hairline with what appears to be miniaturization but otherwise thick hair. I’m having trouble finding stats about the percentage of women with hair transplants who experience shock loss. does anyone know where I find this, or even find anecdotal evidence?

Also, is it better to get a hair transplant while I’m somewhat youngish? Would that reduce the risk of shock loss at all? Do hairs miniaturize again after having a successful fue?

hairlossMy experience over the past four decades has been that most women who experience various forms of alopecia do not speak openly about it and probably one of the primary reasons why you are having a challenging time finding more stats regarding things like shock loss and the like.

It sounds to me that you are experiencing both a recessionary form of AA and also a diffused thinning pattern. Most female hair loss is diffused pattern typically as seen on the Ludwig Scale (chart). A fair percentage of women who have an overall thinning pattern may have the thinning or evidence of miniaturization in their donor zones. If so, then the hair is DHT receptive and can be lost in the future even if it is transplanted to a different area such as the frontal zone. And being young in age won’t have a bearing on shock loss. Shock is always a result of how one responds to the level of trauma induced by the surgery itself.

Can Dandruff Shampoo Cause Hair Transplant Shedding?

Tue 19 Jul 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Feller Medical:

I’m currently at 5 months post-op, and I recently bought a bottle of Head and Shoulders shampoo. I’ve used it once, and I’ve noticed that there was a nickel sized amount of hair in my shower drain. Yesterday, looking in the mirror I noticed to myself: “Hmm… my  hair transplant at 5 months looks much thinner/see-through now than it did just a few days ago”. Then, to confirm that suspicion I saw the nickel (coin) – sized dollop of hair in my shower drain. I haven’t seen hair in my drain in 15 years, as I’m very stable on finasteride for 17 years and counting

I won’t be using H&S shampoo again — my recipient site (frontal third) looks thinner now. FYI, my prior shampoo was just Axe shampoo — bought it just cuz it was cheap, but it’s not a dandruff shampoo.

QUESTIONS:

  1. Will the hair that shed grow back?
  2. Why did only “new” HT hair shed?
  3. Has anyone else ever had this experience?

shampooWhat was the active ingredient that made it “Head and Shoulders dandruff” versus just regular “head and shoulders?” I think a lot of our patients use the regular “head and shoulders” — Dr Feller is a fan — and I haven’t heard of any complaints before. But there could be some other “active ingredient” here.

Treating Small Patchy Areas of Hair Loss with Hair Transplant Surgery?

Fri 15 Jul 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. David Josephitis

I’ve previously posted, with regards to getting a hair transplant, and in looking through the hair loss forums over the last few months, it seems the best candidates are those that have had quite a bit of hair loss.

In my own case I’ve got thinning in the crown, probably the diameter of a potato crisp, and some loss in the temples but generally have a full head of hair. I was reluctant to try Rogaine as when you stop the hair falls out.. and Propecia because of the side effects. So I considered a HT.. I’m 45 at the moment.

So my question is, given the fact that implanting in areas where there is diffuse loss, causes shock loss, and you get shock loss in donor areas, for people who mostly have a full head of hair. Is getting a few patches treated, something that causes more damage than benefit? Any input would be much appreciated.

Dr_Josephitas_protraitPeople can have a hair transplant for a variety of reasons. Some, as you mention, get hair restoration surgery they have had much loss. In these patients, the results can be quite dramatic. Others, get a procedure when they have some thinning hair that is mainly not yet noticeable to the casual observer. These patients don’t want to go through that “thin” phase. Others like yourself with just small areas of loss wish to improve on those areas. While the overall change may not be as impressive as my first example, the difference is definitely welcomed by the patient.

Is Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) Hair Transplant the Right Choice for Me?

Tue 12 Jul 2016

I just booked my follicular unit extraction(FUE) procedure for 2 weeks from now. I am 23, and about a 2 on the Norwood Scale. I am extremely nervous for the procedure, was FUE the right choice? I see so many pictures online of patients that have donor site thinning, also is 1,400 a good number?

NWIIAt 23 with NWII hair loss, hair restoration surgery would not normally be advisable unless you have a documented family history of little to no hair loss. Have you been educated about the likelihood of future balding? Have you been advised to medically stabilize your hair loss with Propecia (finasteride) and Rogaine (minoxidil)?

As for whether or not FUE is a good choice, that is generally up to the patient and physician to decide based on several factors. Donor depletion is not an issue when the procedure is performed by a skilled hair restoration physician. Furthermore, in your particular case, this is a small procedure and overharvesting will not be a concern. Dr. Rahal will spread the extractions out over a large enough area that the change will be unnoticeable.

David

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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What Sacrifices Have You Made for Hair Restoration?

Mon 11 Jul 2016

As they say, “nothing worthwhile comes without sacrifice”. While today’s revolutionary hair transplants can restore a natural looking head of hair, time, money, and patients are among several items balding men and women have to be willing to put in to achieving their hair restoration goals. What are you willing to sacrifice?

In a recent discussion forum topic, several dedicated members of our community share their personal journeys and what they’ve had to sacrifice to obtain the beautiful head of hair they have today. To read their personal reflections and to share your own, visit “What Have You Sacrifice for Hair Restoration?

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
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Watch hair transplant videos  on YouTube

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Get to Know Coalition Hair Transplant Surgeon Dr. Jean Devroye on Video

Sun 10 Jul 2016

Coalition member Dr. Jean Devroye  provides large densely packed sessions of ultra refined follicular unit hair transplantation  when appropriate for the patient with excellent results.   To see dozens of examples of his fantastic work, visit the “Results Posted by Leading Hair Transplant Clinics” forum.

Some time ago, we uploaded a collection of   hair transplant videos interviewing  Dr. Devroye  on YouTube.   To learn more about Dr. Devroye, his experience, skill, and philosophy on patient care, visit “Hair Transplant Video Interviews with Dr. Jean Devroye“.

To see all of our hair transplant  videos, visit our Hair Transplant Video Channel on YouTube.

For a few of the video interviews with Dr. Devroye, see below. Your input and feedback is welcome.

Hair Restoration Solutions by Dr. Jean Devroye

Today’s State of the art Hair Transplants by Dr. Jean Devroye

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum
Follow our community on Twitter
Watch hair transplant videos  on YouTube

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Can I Lower My Naturally High Hairline with Hair Transplant Surgery?

Thu 7 Jul 2016

I’ve been considering follicular unit extraction (FUE) as an option to lower a naturally high hairline by maybe 1-1.5cm, would this be my best option.

high-hairlineYes, hair transplant surgery can be used to lower a naturally high hairline. However, whether or not this is a good idea in your specific case will depend on a number of factors like your age, where your hairline is now, where you want it placed and your potential for future hair loss.

As you may know, we have a finite number of donor hairs to draw from. If your family history indicates that you may experience hair loss in the future, then creating a juvenile hairline now would not be a good idea. You could run out of donor hair for future procedures and be left with an unnatural appearance.

To provide useful feedback we would need to see a photo of your current hairline and details about any existing hair loss and family history of balding.

Your best bet is to consult with one or more recommended hair transplant surgeons.

David

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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Can I Have Cowlicks Removed During Hair Transplant Surgery?

Tue 5 Jul 2016

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. David Josephitis

I am an Asian male, 49 yrs old and I want to have a hair transplant to restore my crown but there is a dilemma. I have two cowlicks I dislike having but the hair restoration physicians that I have consulted with thinks it would be best to recreate the whorl pattern.

My question is, why not do away with the cowlicks and just have the hairs arranged so the hairs will lie without a swirl pattern? I’m not bald yet, just have thinning hair on the vertex. What do you think is the best plan of attack to fix this? Doctors can recreate hairlines without a cowlick. Why not vertexes?

Dr_Josephitas_protraitCowlicks or swirls in the vertex of the scalp are actually quite necessary. I understand you didn’t “want” them growing up, but they are really just a natural pattern that has to be reproduced in a hair transplant. The best way to understand why I am saying this is to look at a young boy’s head and really study the cowlick. If you look carefully, it is really just a slowly changing direction of the hair. Hair in the front of the head is forward facing and hair on the back and sides is downwards facing. Those directions cannot be changed. The only way for the hairs in the front to transition into hairs facing downwards on the sides and back is to have this swirl. The swirl allows the hair to change direction.