This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

Is it possible to use your father’s donor area for a hair transplant? I think that the answer is no, but I still want to confirm. I have got baldness from my maternal side. My father has a thick full head of hair. Irony with me is that I am a 6 on the Norwood Scale with retrograde alopecia.

Dr. CharlesThe only way hair restoration surgery has been shown to be successful from one person to another is if they are identical twins.

You have to remember that you get half your genes from the father and half from the mother.

Dr. Glenn Charles

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

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This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Mike Vories:

Are Patients with Diffuse Hair Loss Good Candidates for Hair Transplant Surgery?

Dr_VorriesIn our experience, diffuse hair loss can be difficult to treat. Attempting to build up hair density while at the same time avoiding trauma to the existing hair makes this a tough case for surgical hair restoration. 5x Loupes to magnify the hair transplant recipient area is a necessity.

Here is a series of photos of a recent follicular unit extraction (FUE) case, Pre-op, immediately post-op and 5 months post-op (submitted by the patient).

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Dr. Mike Vories

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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The following thorough response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

I recently underwent a hair transplant of around 3k grafts. Since my bald area was pretty large, the results obtained from HT are very average to create the illusion of hair. Until I have more money to go for another session, I want to wear a hair replacement system so that it can act as a filler.

I don’t prefer to wear hair system, but in my culture, hair loss is really a stigma in your path to get married. My question is: does a hair system cause any kind of damage to transplanted hair? I am 7 months post my hair restoration surgery.

systemI wore hair systems for 11 years before my first hair transplant. One of the things that I noticed was that my native hair continued to be stifled and stunted from both growth and overall density. My systems covered the entire top of my scalp and polyfuse (glue) was used to hold it in place.

My first HT procedure involved strengthening my weak hairline that was diffusing and receding. The rest of the grafts were placed in the frontal zone. My hair transplant surgeon advised me to stop wearing the system because he felt that some of my native hair would grow back.

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I’m looking to undergo body hair transplantation (BHT) using grafts from my beard region. But I’m wondering, will extracting beard follicles from my neck and chin leave scarring?

body hair transplantBHT will leave scarring in the extracted regions. This means scarring in the beard region if grafts are taken from this area. Most BHT experts are aware of this and will extract accordingly. Grafts are taken from less visible regions of the head and neck (IE under the chin). A reasonable number of grafts are taken to reduce scarring as well.

There will still be scarring, even with these precautions taken. It is usually minimal, but it will be there.

I think it’s important to understand this. The FUE method – which is used for BHT – minimizes scarring, but does not eliminate it. If you examine the extraction area closely, you will see hypopigmented (light skinned), circular scarring. This may not be a “deal breaker” for you if it’s taken under the chin. You should be fully aware, however, that there will be scarring to some extend regardless of where or how it’s taken.
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Blake Bloxham – formerly “Future_HT_Doc”

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

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This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Mike Vories:

Does follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) consistently produce better results than follicular unit extraction (FUE)?

Dr_VorriesAs a hair restoration surgeon who practiced FUSS for about seven years before switching to FUE, I do not believe that strip surgery delivers “healthier” grafts compared to FUE, or that strip has better graft survival than FUE. I do believe that FUSS grafts that are hand placed are more likely to survive compared to hand placed FUE grafts, due to the skeletal morphology of FUE grafts in comparison.

Grafts placed with implanter pens remove this variable, and using them has given me equal survival with the two techniques.

Dr. Mike Vories

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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My hair transplant doctor told me clearly that I will have to start finasteride and minoxidil 5% to control further hair loss. But because I’m getting married 10 months after my procedure, he advised me to start Rogaine (minoxidil) only and not to take finasteride until afterward since my hair loss is not currently progressing.

My question is, does finasteride really causes impotency? Can I start finasteride after my wetting for better hair growth? As I have heard so many bad things about finasteride and I am very concerned about it.

impotenceYou’ll find a lot of guys who have used finasteride for years with little or no side effects. You’ll also find some that had severe side effects and had to quit. In rare cases, we’ve heard from guys who say that the side effects remained even after quitting the drug. There is no way to tell what your experience will be but I can state for you what the clinical trials say.

According to Merck, the manufacturer of Propecia (1mg finasteride), less than 2% of men who use the drug will experience sexual side effects. Of those that do, the effects will subside upon discontinuation.

Side effects can range from loss of libido and less frequent and softer erections to impotence. The drug may also cause testicular pain and male breast development (gynecomastia).

If your hair is in good shape for the time being, I’d say why not wait the 10 months and give it a try after your wedding?

I’m 28 years old and about 2 years ago I lost all my hair around my temples and minor recession on the front right side of my head. It looks as though this is the extent of my balding (assumption as father and grandfather only lost temple hair). I’m just wondering which surgical procedure would best benefit my scenario of covering up my temples and the very slight recession on the front right of my head?

The closest “known” surgeon in my area is Dr. Thomas Nakatsui, I booked an appointment today….but it’s a 3 month wait. In addition, I did consult my family physician and he gave me finasteride (1/4 tablet a day). I tried it for about a month and I had to stop right away as I experienced symptoms of the drug and was told by my doctor to completely stop as it could lead to life long problems later on.

Therefore, I feel since I have only lost temple hair and minor recession I feel surgery is the best way to go instead of wasting money in the long run spent on Rogaine…etc.

Rogaine and PropeciaIt can be difficult in younger patients like you to predict just how far hair loss will progress. Looking at family history on both sides may offer some insights but there are no guarantees. The older the patient, the more accurately we can predict the final extent of that person’s balding.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Shapiro Medical:

I recently had follicular unit extraction (FUE) and I have some bumps on my head on the area where the grafts are implanted. One bump is not visible, but you can feel it and when you press it, it hurts a bit. There are also some visible smaller bumps with a red color. What should I do? Can it harm the hair growth?

post-op-pimpleMost likely you have had your FUE hair transplant within the last few weeks. Occasionally after hair restoration surgery some of the recipient sites can become inflamed and if worse still, infected.

My initial recommendations for patients with only a few red and tender areas on the scalp would be to make sure you are shampooing the scalp daily and preferably with an antibacterial shampoo. Also, apply topical antibiotic ointment to the worst offending areas at least twice a day for about a week. Avoid picking or scratching the areas.

Still, after having said this, it is best to follow up with your hair transplant surgeon in the office or on the phone to update them on your progress. If necessary, they may also want to put you on some oral antibiotics.

If you take care of this in a timely manner, there should really be no ill effects on the final FUE result.

This below question was asked by a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums and answered by recommended hair restoration surgeon Dr. Tejinder Bhatti.

Is it true that the body hair transplant (BHT) donor site should be shaved 4 to 5 days prior to surgery in order to avoid harvesting delicate telogen hairs that are likely to be damaged?

Dr-Bhatti-photoIt is always a good idea to undertake an anagen selective follicular unit extraction (FUE) hair transplant. Anagen phase hair are robust hair and grow better and faster and give an early result. Anagen hair can be selected either visually or mechanically (visual selection or mechanical selection).

Those who harvest using 4.5 – 6 x magnification can very well distinguish an anagen hair from a telogen hair and target it (cherry picking). However, most hair transplant surgeons use 2x magnification which makes finer details impossible. In such cases, shaving the chest 3 days before the procedure will ensure that only anagen hair are harvested. This is what is called mechanical selection. The latter case should also apply to scalp hair and not body hair alone.

Use of proper magnification is rarely talked of but is an important component of a successful hair restoration procedure.

Dr. Tejinder Bhatti

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

The following response was posted to our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums by Dr. Jerry Cooley of Charlotte, NC who is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

Do older men and women still care about treating hair loss or are hair transplants just for younger patients?

Dr-Cooly-portraitI have a significant number of men and women in their 60’s and 70’s who come in for hair restoration. My oldest patient ever was 83 and he continued to enjoy his new hairline until he was 95 when I last saw him. Older patients have the same motivation as younger patients (i.e. look better and restore self-image) and they usually have more realistic expectations.

Some of the issues in performing hair transplant surgery on older patients include working with gray/white hair which can be challenging and they are often on several prescription medications for health issues, so we have to sometimes do things a little differently and monitor closer to make sure we keep our procedure safe. But otherwise, they heal just as well and have the same graft growth.

I enjoy seeing a diversity of patients including age, gender, racial backgrounds, types of alopecia, etc.

Dr. Jerry Cooley

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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