FUT (Follicular Unit Transplant)


This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I’m a female hair loss sufferer. I’ve tried a variety of different medications and therapies, but nothing seems to work. I’m now considering a surgical solution and wondering if I am a candidate for hair transplantation. Can females undergo hair transplant surgery?

female hair lossYes, female patients can undergo hair transplant surgery. However, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) and androgenic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) are two very different conditions, and treating hair loss in women is often a more difficult task. Unlike male baldness, where hair sheds in patterns and leaves a viable donor region for transplantation, female hair loss is often diffuse and leaves a poor permanent donor region. This makes extraction of healthy follicular unit grafts more difficult.

Female hair loss may also be caused by a variety of complicated issues. Unlike androgenic alopecia, which is universally caused by a sensitivity to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) hormone, female hair loss can be attributed to a variety of hormonal imbalances, low blood levels, menopause, hair styling (though this is normally temporary), low iron, and other issues. Females of childbearing age are also unable to utilize finasteride (Propecia), which decreases the options for preventive medications. This means female patients must be thoroughly examined by specialized physicians (usually either endocrinologists or dermatologists) and carefully use other preventive methods before considering surgery.

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I recently scheduled a hair transplant procedure with a trusted surgeon. After scheduling, however, I found a bad review online. I performed a lot of research and felt comfortable with the doctor, but now I’m not sure. Should I cancel the procedure after finding a bad review of my hair transplant surgeon online?

consultationIf you search hard enough, you will likely find “dirt” on every hair transplant surgeon practicing today. Not only is it difficult to verify this information, especially when it comes from unfamiliar sources, but no surgeon “bats a thousand” and all doctors have a few bad cases. 

However, conducting thorough research and choosing a surgeon who has been carefully reviewed and approved by experts and patients alike usually helps ensure quality work. Recommended hair transplant surgeons boast impressive track records and most patients come to the same conclusion during their research. Stress before a hair transplant procedure is definitely understandable, and online feedback should not be automatically dismissed. However, performing diligent research and consulting with proven, trusted physicians usually helps lead to positive outcomes and impressive results! 
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

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Technorati Tags: hair loss, hair transplant,

This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by Dr. Jerry Cooley of Charlotte, NC who is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

Dr. Cooley, I had follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) with you back in April, and at that time, I said I wanted to get as much as I could as I hoped it would be the last one I would do (because I really don’t know how much more could be done, given the two 500 graft procedures I had back in the 1990’s). If at some point in the future I wanted one more procedure, would you recommend follicular unit extraction (FUE) or another strip hair transplant for my situation?

image_cooleyGreat question! In my practice, helping a patient decide on FUE vs FUSS involves weighing several factors. Most of my patients wear medium length hair and place a premium on being able to get back to work in a week and, since we generally don’t shave donor or recipient, this is very realistic.

If my patient wears their hair very short anyway and wants to avoid any chance of a noticeable linear scar, then FUE is the best bet. For someone who has had prior procedures, scalp laxity is a big factor. Minimal scalp laxity may push us toward FUE. On the other hand, if you healed well from the last procedure and have decent remaining laxity, another strip procedure would be the way to go.

Dr Wu BetterOnly physicians with a proven record of producing excellent hair transplant results are approved for recommendation at the Hair Transplant Network. After thorough review, we are pleased to announce that Dr. Wen-Yi Wu of Taipei, Taiwan has been approved for recommendation on the Hair Transplant Network. To learn how we pre-screen and recommend hair transplant surgeons, click here.

Dr. Wu, his technique and results were carefully reviewed by our hair restoration forum and social community in consideration for recommendation. The majority of the feedback we received regarding his potential inclusion has been highly supportive. To see what our members are saying, visit the Potential Recommendation of Dr. Wen-Yi Wu of Taipei, Taiwan.

Given the positive feedback we received from patients, physicians and forum members and his dedication to state of the art FUT (Follicular Unit Strip Sugery or FUSS) and Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) hair transplant surgery, Dr. Wu has been approved for recommendation on the Hair Transplant Network. To view Dr. Wu’s recommendation profile, click here.

Thanks to everyone who provided their valuable input regarding Dr. Wu’s potential recommendation. You are encouraged to congratulate him by clicking on his featured potential inclusion topic above. 

For hair loss sufferers considering hair transplant surgery in Taiwan and beyond, we strongly encourage you to consult with and consider Dr. Wen-Yi Wu for your procedure.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I recently consulted with a hair transplant surgeon who recommended the use of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) during the procedure. Is this useful? How is PRP generally used? Does PRP actually increase the yield or growth of a hair transplant procedure?

PRPRecently, more hair transplant surgeons have begun utilizing PRP in surgery. The physicians using PRP during hair transplants do so in two different ways:

1.) By treating the recipient area with PRP prior to (or during) graft insertion. 

2.) Using PRP (or platelet poor plasma – PPP) as a follicular unit graft storage medium.

These physicians believe the use of PRP helps improve yield, decreases healing time, and helps grafts stay healthy while outside the body. However, this has not been thoroughly researched and all evidence is anecdotal at this point in time. 

Those seeking more information may be interested in the following article: Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP): An Important Role in Hair Transplant Surgery? Hopefully it provides some additional information.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , , , hair transplant

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I’m researching surgery and noticing that most clinics use hair transplant technicians for the placement of the follicular unit grafts. Is this standard practice? Is it okay for technicians to place grafts during hair transplant surgery?

graft placement techsIn my opinion, hair transplant technicians are highly proficient at their jobs. In fact, all top-notch clinics understand that hair transplant surgery is a team effort, and the doctors managing these clinics train, review, and retain the best technicians. While many doctors certainly assist in the placement process, I really think the majority of this work will always fall on the technicians. Which, again, I believe falls under their job description and they are more than capable of handling.

In fact, quality clinics employee technicians who have placed thousands upon thousands of grafts and are likely the most qualified to do so. This is akin to the manner in which a trained doctor is the most qualified to remove the grafts and make the incision sites. Altogether, technicians placing grafts at trusted, reviewed clinics is, in my opinion, standard practice. Keep in mind that this doesn’t take placement with an implanter pen (like the Choi and Lion implanter pen) into consideration (which still involves technicians priming the pen for the doctor).
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

“Shock loss” is a term both dreaded and feared by many undergoing hair transplant surgery. Despite its notoriety, however, shock loss is a complicated subject and may be confusing for many hair transplant patients. So what is shock loss and why does it occur? In order to answer these questions and help clarify the mystery behind shock loss, Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. William Lindsey created the following video explaining shock loss and why it occurs after hair restoration surgery:

[embedyt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4o7nwvd0xw&feature=youtu.be[/embedyt]

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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center,

the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: , hair transplant surgery, , ,

Dr_Wesley_photoPatients are often pleasantly surprised to learn during their initial consultation that our practice does not require patients to shave their heads for a follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) procedure. As Coalition hair restoration physician Dr. Carlos Wesley operates on only one patient per day, it is much easier to take the time to carefully navigate around the pre-existing hairs during recipient site creation.

The benefit to hair transplant patients occurs not only in the immediate short term, (7-10 days) post-operatively when the redness can be better camouflaged by the longer native hairs, but also during the first few months of early hair growth when the transplanted hairs are just beginning to grow and provide coverage and density.

Here is an example of one of our patients whose pre-existing hair helped camouflage the redness and the stubble for the short-term postoperative period after hair transplant surgery.

MA_Slide1

 

His intraoperative appearance can be seen in the video below:

For more of Dr. Carlos Wesley’s patient results view the discussion, “Why we don’t require shaving the recipient area: Dr. Carlos K. Wesley (NYC)” from our hair loss forum and social community.

Billena,
Media Assistant for Dr. Carlos Wesley

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David (TakingThePlunge)
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I’m undergoing a hair transplant procedure soon, but I’m worried my body will reject the implanted grafts and the surgery will be a failure. I have read about several cases online where this occurred, but it seems like it had more to do with the surgery team than the patient’s physiology. Is there a possibility that the procedure could go perfectly but my body rejects the hair transplant?

LPPYes, there are instances where patient physiology is solely responsible for poor yield. However, this is a very rare occurrence and it is usually difficult to distinguish from human error. 

When it is not caused by an external error, a hair transplant that simply “won’t take” or is “rejected” by the body is usually caused by post-transplant Lichen Planopilaris (LPP). LPP is an inflammatory scalp disorder that normally results in patchy alopecia. According to the literature, however, there have been at least 17 cases of LPP that developed within 4-36 months after hair transplant surgery. The authors of these studies concluded that the LPP caused the poor yield and was “set off” by the hair transplant. However, 17 reported cases out of the thousands of hair transplant procedures performed each year is a very small percentage of alleged LPP caused failures.

This question, asked by a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by “Jotronic” – a clinic representative for Coalition hair transplant surgeons Dr. Victor Hasson and Jerry Wong,

For those that have done hair transplant scar revisions, did the revision strip also yield a few usable grafts (Assuming the only goal was to make the scar better but a few grafts happen to be in the strip taken out)?

0_6181A proper scar revision will require cutting out all of the scar so that only healthy skin tissue meets healthy skin tissue when the wound is closed for the best healing. How this is done depends on the doctor performing the revision. Some hair restoration physicians will follow the exact outline of the existing scar to purposely avoid getting viable grafts. However, this will always yield at least a few grafts.

Other doctors will instead remove all of the scar tissue based on the laxity in the immediate vicinity as the revision progresses along the scar line, which will always result in some grafts being removed as well. This can vary to just a handful of grafts being 20 to 30 or up to 400 or so depending on the size and variations of the scar shape and direction.

I hope this helps.

Jotronic
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David (TakingThePlunge)
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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