FUT (Follicular Unit Transplant)


This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

I had a hair transplant about fifteen years ago using the follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) technique. It left me with a wide scar. Last December I underwent a follicular unit extraction FUE procedure to increase the density and improve the hairline on top. I could not get my scar filled then using FUE as it would make sleeping a nightmare and I would have probably dislodged some grafts either in the scar or on top.

I would like to proceed before the summer to have my strip scar filled in using FUE. It’s three months since my last surgery. Do I have to wait a certain amount of time before harvesting grafts from my donor area again? Does the donor area need a set time to recover? Could I proceed with my scar repair in the next three months?

Dr. CharlesYou could have more FUE harvesting done at this time.

If there are a few areas that your hair restoration physician did not harvest from during your last procedure, those would be the preferable areas to take from for this next procedure.

Dr. Glenn Charles
—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

I had a follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) 10 days ago and the donor cut is really long. It extends beyond ear to ear, almost into temple areas. What can I do or shouldn’t do to take care of it so that the scar is as thin as possible?

Dr. CharlesI always instruct the patient to not hyper-flex the neck for the first few months following the hair transplant. This means do not try to touch your chin to your chest. Patients have a tendency to want to do this after a short period of time to test out the area and see if it still hurts. This will only contract your trapezius (traps) muscles in your neck and potentially widen the scar.

Even after the sutures are removed there is still internal healing that take s several months.

Dr. Glenn Charles
—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , ,

The following response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

I had a hair transplant done about 6 days ago. Most of the swelling in the recipient are has gone away. However, there is a lot of swelling above the scar still. Is it too early to be getting alarmed about this? What is a reasonable amount of time for this swelling to persist? Any advice would be appreciated.

question markThe swelling and inflammation certainly can be acute especially in the first week following the procedure. Most hair restoration clinics will recommend icing the area for 10 minutes on and off. Yet once you get a week or more post-op, the ice packs are not as effective as they are in the first 3-5 days.

Did your hair transplant surgeon provide you any medication or a script for an anti-inflammatory?

The next week or so should bring some relief and try to not do any strenuous activity which could increase pressure to the area and inflame it.

Wish you much relief in the days to come.

Gillenator
Supporting Hair Restoration Physicians: Dr. Glenn Charles, Boca Raton, FL – Dr. Jerry Cooley, Charlotte, NC – Dr. Jim Harris, Denver, CO – Dr. Robert True & Dr. Robert Dorin, New York, NY


David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Feller Medical:

Can you tell anything about how a strip hair transplant scar will look and the possibility of it stretching by looking at scars from other procedures the patient might have had?

Crystal-ballGreat question. I’ll give you the most doctor answer possible: it depends.

Got to love it, right? Allow me to try and explain.

I actually get into discussions about “other” scars with patients pretty frequently. And of course this always involves a little bit of “show and tell”. Some of the most recent ones during consultations include: a parathyroid (you asked for medical opinion!) surgery scar in the neck, a neurosurgery scar in the donor area, and some sort of gash in the forearm that was treated, at home, with tape. Why do these patients show me their scars? Because they have the same question you do: Does the healing of scars on other parts of my body provide any insight as to how my strip scar may heal?

In the following article posted on our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Scott Alexander shares his opinion about shaving the head for surgical hair restoration:

Dr_AlexanderTo shave or not to shave? This is a question that seems to be very popular at this time and I have many patients request that they not be shaved in the recipient area for the surgery.

Since I had my hair transplant, there were some things that bothered me as a patient post op. One of them was shaving the recipient area, so I truly understand and can relate as a patient to the incredible anxiety associated with the “shaving“ aspects of the surgery in the recipient area. (The donor region tends not to be too much concern as this can be disguised or it recovers easily due to the length hair can be worn )

This is why I decided to offer and provide a non-shave option for patients that I feel are suitable and also specifically request it. If I feel I can achieve and get as good a result and the patient specifically needs the least intrusive method so that he/she can get back to work sooner and requires a quicker recovery time, then I am happy to perform the surgery accordingly to help benefit the patient in the short term.

This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Mike Vories:
Do you ever do many follicular unit extraction (FUE) grafts in to strip scars? And if so, do you find that they turn out well?

Dr_VorriesOver half of our hair transplant patients with previous strip excision surgery ask to place grafts into the strip scar. We have had modest success with this, but it is best to test the strip scar with about 100 or so grafts before using more hair (and more money) to concealing a scar that may or may not result in hair growth.

All scars are different, some with excellent blood supply, some with poor blood supply. Best to test it first. Hope this helps!

Dr. Mike Vories
—-
David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: Hair Loss, , , ,

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Shapiro Medical:

I had a follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) hair transplant about 10 years ago, and I was looking into going through a second one soon. I had a consultation with Dr. Rahal in Ottawa who suggested a second strip with 3000 grafts for the front section and the crown area which I think would be a great improvement for me. However he apparently shaves the whole region where new hair will be implanted, which will leave only the mid-section of my head with native hair. Keeping my native hair everywhere would make concealing the recipient areas much more easy.

Looking through the pictures, it looks as though even if I take 4 weeks off work, it will still be quite apparent that I went through surgery after that period, as regrown hair will be very short. I don’t want it to show.

Follicular unit extraction (FUE) is out of question for me as my previous scar will be apparent as shaving the back of the whole head is necessary.

Is shaving the recipient area standard in strip procedures, or should I just keep looking for another hair restoration surgeon who is willing to do it without shaving?

ishrschicagoOverview of the 2015 ISHRS Meeting

The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) held its annual scientific meeting in Chicago, Illinois this year. The yearly gathering brings together many of the world’s leading hair transplant surgeons and hair loss  researchers to discuss advancements in medical and surgical hair restoration. Continuing the trend from last year’s meeting, discussion topics focused predominantly on Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) and future hair loss treatments.

Background on the ISHRS

The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) is the most prominent professional organization for hair restoration in the world. Their primary mission is to educate hair surgeons ranging from the novice to the expert. Their website (http://www.ishrs.org/) provides useful information about hair restoration and profiles and contact information for its 700 plus worldwide physician members. This year’s meeting was conducted by the current ISHRS President Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Sharon Keene and program chair Dr. Nilofer Farjo.

At the meeting, Dr. Kuniyoshi Yagyu replaced Dr. Sharon Keene as the acting President of the ISHRS for the coming year.  Congratulations to Dr. Yagyu for receiving this high honor.

Physician Recognition and Awards

Congratulations to the following award recipients:

Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Bernard P. Nusbaum was awarded the Golden Follicle Award for his role in developing innovative hair restoration techniques and furthering the advancement of hair restoration.

Dr. Pierre Bouhanna won the coveted Platinum Follicle Award for his outstanding achievements in basic science and clinically-related research in hair pathophysiology and anatomy.

Today’s hair transplant procedures have done wonders in transforming balding men into hairy men. However, given the progressive nature of male pattern baldness, what happens if hair loss progresses further? Are more hair transplants needed? Will there be enough donor hair available to cover future thinning and bald areas? What will a patient’s transplanted hair look like in 30 years? Do hair transplants stand the test of time?

Anyone considering hair replacement surgery should work with a reputable and skilled hair transplant surgeon on creating not only short term, but long term goals. Planning for future hair loss is an important part of any long term hair restoration plan.

To discuss these concerns and learn why hair transplant surgery with appropriate planning can stand the test of time, visit the discussion topic “Multiple Hair Transplants“.

Bill Seemiller
Managing Publisher of the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum and Social Community
Follow our community on Twitter
Watch hair transplant videos  on YouTube

Technorati Tags: , , male pattern baldness, , , , , , ,

The following response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “MrGio”, Online Representative for Coalition Hair Transplant Surgeon Dr. Patrick Mwamba:

The aspects of follicular unit extraction FUE hair transplantation that patients should be mindful of is cost, transection rate of the hair transplant surgeon, and experience of the surgeon’s medical assistants. Surgical hair restoration is an investment for the patients that can be for better or worse. A patient shouldn’t pay too much and shouldn’t pay too little for an FUE session. FUE is more labor intensive than follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS), and hence there is a difference in the cost of the procedures.

Transection is the terminal damage of a patient’s precious donor resources. Since donor resources are certainly finite, patients should want to ensure that their surgeon is producing minimal trauma in their donor area. A good FUE surgeon can provide his or her patient with a relatively low rate of transection. Damaging a significant amount of hair will usually provide poor aesthetic results and insurmountable loss to restore future hair loss. There is no better way of describing this atrocity than considering a patient to be a donor of their hair follicles to medical science. Wasting hair to inefficient harvesting methods essentially realizes a patient to be an unsuspecting victim and statistic. Paying twice for a graft is tragic.

« Previous PageNext Page »