FUT (Follicular Unit Transplant)


This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Bijan Feriduni:

Dr. Feriduni, In your experience, how wide is the average hair transplant strip scar in mm?

Dr_Feriduni_photoA linear hair transplant scar is always influenced by various factors and those factors are often decisive in the outcome of a linear scar, such as:

Patient factors:

  • Patient’s age (in general better scar results in older patients)
  • Smoking or non-smoking patient
  • Diseases that influence wound healing, such as Diabetes, Ehler-Danlos syndrome etc.
  • Previous surgeries

Surgical factors:

  • Area/position of the linear strip
  • Width of the linear strip – tension
  • Suture technique (single, double layer suture technique, trichophytic closure technique)
  • Experience of the hair restoration surgeon

Postoperative factors:

  • Aftercare (infection, scabbing, etc.)
  • Sports (weight lifting)

In general and under ideal conditions, a linear scar will be between 1mm and 4mm in width and invisible when the hairs are buzzed in grade 2-3. In case of a full buzz cut a linear scar will always be visible, even when the outcome is optimal, due to the scar tissue and difference in skin structure.

Kindest regards,

Dr. Bijan Feriduni
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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

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This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Mike Vories:

Does follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) consistently produce better results than follicular unit extraction (FUE)?

Dr_VorriesAs a hair restoration surgeon who practiced FUSS for about seven years before switching to FUE, I do not believe that strip surgery delivers “healthier” grafts compared to FUE, or that strip has better graft survival than FUE. I do believe that FUSS grafts that are hand placed are more likely to survive compared to hand placed FUE grafts, due to the skeletal morphology of FUE grafts in comparison.

Grafts placed with implanter pens remove this variable, and using them has given me equal survival with the two techniques.

Dr. Mike Vories

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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This below question was asked by a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums and answered by recommended hair restoration surgeon Dr. Tejinder Bhatti.

Does anyone have any opinion as to which offers better success – hair from the beard or from the chest? From an aesthetic perspective, it appears chest hair may be a better option as it’s less visible to others than the beard. How about the quality of transplanted hair (texture specifically)? Would chest hair be equally good (or comparable from the scalp)?

Dr-Bhatti-photoBody hair is a boon for patients with a meager supply of scalp donor hair or in patients who are coming in for a revision of a poor hair transplant result. Besides rapid follicular unit extraction (FUE) harvest, body hair transplantation (BHT) is presently my favorite field!

Though follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) is undoubtedly the Gold Standard of surgical hair restoration and shall always remain so, FUE rose in popularity due mostly to the fact that it has opened the horizons to a limitless supply of grafts by expanding the traditional donor availability. The other advantages may be debatable but this has no opposition even from die-hard strip surgeons. Thanks to FUE, the patient base has markedly increased in size. Repair cases and cases with extensive balding which were shunned earlier, can again think of getting back a “head full of hair.”

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Shapiro Medical:

Does transplanted hair always match in color? For example, some people begin greying around the back and sides long before they go grey up top. So is it possible before someone begins getting greys that hair grafts taken from the donor area might be due to turn grey before the native hair in the area they are transplanted to; possibly leaving the person with a noticeably unusual pattern of greys sprouting from the crown or perhaps with a rebuilt frontal hairline of almost entirely grey hair?

And, greys aside, do some people maybe have slightly darker or lighter hair color variation from back & sides compared to up top, and similarly, could this mean weird or unnatural looking crown or hairline?

grayhairmanTransplanted hairs do not always match exactly the surrounding native hairs. The color and sometimes the caliber can be slightly different.  For patients who are already starting to lose the color in their hair, sometimes we can avoid certain areas of the donor when transplanting. For patients like yourself that have not yet gone gray, it is really unknown what your the future distribution of hair color will be.

The following thorough response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

From the safe zone of head, how many grafts would be available total for the average male? How about just multiple sessions of follicular unit extraction (FUE)?

fue-donorA very general response for the average individual would be 5,000 – 7,000 grafts for follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) and add another 2,000 if it is FUE.

We have to consider that donor level density, size of the donor regions, and competence of the hair restoration physician all impact these numbers.

For FUE only, this would really depend on the individual’s overall scalp density. Why? Because let’s say one individual has average density, then the average might be 6,000 -8,000 utilizing all of the scalp donor zones including the sides and parietal zones.

If you go much higher than that, then the donor zones can potentially begin to appear thin and over-harvested especially if the scalp is buzzed down. But if the individual had upper end density levels, then 8,000 plus is not out of the question.

Gillenator
Supporting Hair Restoration Physicians: Dr. Glenn Charles, Boca Raton, FL – Dr. Jerry Cooley, Charlotte, NC – Dr. Jim Harris, Denver, CO – Dr. Robert True & Dr. Robert Dorin, New York, NY

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a staff physician from Coalition hair transplant clinic Shapiro Medical:

I want to fix my thinning hair with hair transplant surgery. However, I’ve heard transplanting into thinning areas (opposed to completely bald scalp) can cause my native (non-transplanted) hair to fall out or undergo “shock loss.” Is this true? Is shock loss permanent? Am I still a transplant candidate?

thinning hairPatients usually get transplants for one of two reasons. Some have very thin or bald areas and transplant into those areas to replace what they have lost. Others, like yourself have thinning, but may still be able to somewhat conceal that loss with existing hair. The latter will get a transplant because they don’t want to be completely bald before they do anything about their hair loss. Both types are great candidates for surgery. The only issue with patients like yourself with native hair still in the area that is to be worked on, is that it is indeed more sensitive to “shock loss.” Thankfully men seem less sensitive to this phenomenon than women and rarely lose a large amount of hair. This shock loss usually resolves after a few months and grows back with your transplanted hair. Some of the finer hairs that were already on their way out may not return, but in the end, they most likely did not impact the overall density anyway.

This question, from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. Glenn Charles:

The top of my scalp seems to be pretty tight. Would this tightness be a problem for hair transplant surgery?

Dr. CharlesI have had patients that had tight scalps with very little elasticity who I recommended we try follicular unit extraction (FUE) and got good results.

The best way to determine if your scalp is too tight for follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) is to visit a hair restoration physician. Sometimes a patient will describe their scalp as being very tight and upon physical examination the scalp has good elasticity.

Dr. Glenn Charles

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David
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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This question, asked by a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums, was answered by a representative for Coalition hair transplant surgeon Dr. H. Rahal:

I’m undergoing hair transplant surgery next month. The clinic said to stop minoxidil (Rogaine) one month before the procedure. Why do I need to stop the medication? Is one month before surgery the recommended time period for stopping minoxidil?

RogaineRogaine/Minoxidil promotes blood circulation and flow to the scalp (to promote healthy hair growth to your native hairs). We ask that you stop using it a month prior to your procedure to minimize bleeding on the day of your procedure. Since we’re making several hundreds to thousands of incisions to our recipient area, we don’t want you to bleed any more than you need to. In addition, it makes it easier to continue to make the incisions during the procedure and allows for easier implanting.

-Robert, Senior Patient Adviser
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Blake Bloxham – formerly “Future_HT_Doc”

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

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This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I’m interested in hair transplant surgery. When I first started my research, I had no idea two separate methods of the procedure existed. I visit online hair loss discussion forums, and see a lot of people arguing about which technique is “better” – follicular unit extraction (FUE) or strip surgery (follicular unit strip surgery). Now, I’m confused; which procedure is better for me?

FUE v stripThe “fue vs strip” debate does stir up quite a bit of controversy online. Frankly, I think it comes down to two points: accepting more consistent growth yield with strip surgery, but also accepting the linear strip scar; or forgoing the traditional strip scar in favor of less consistent growth.

So, which procedure is “better” for you? Which one should you chose?

In my opinion, there are patients who are better suited for strip procedures and those better suited for FUE. These strip patients MUST understand the reality of the linear scar. But if they do, I think they will simply receive more “bang for their buck” with strip.

The best way to figure this out is by consulting with trusted hair restoration physicians. Discuss FUE versus strip thoroughly with several of these doctors. They should be very comfortable with both methods. Share your goals and what you see as the “pros and cons” of each procedure. Lastly, come up with a solid – and personal – answer to this question: would I rather shoot for increased yield in one pass and deal with a variable linear scar? Or, is the scar a “deal breaker” and I’d prefer more variable yields with less visible scarring?

The following thorough response to a question from the Hair Restoration Social Community and Discussion Forums, was written by forum member “Gillenator”.

I have a simple question. I have a hair transplant booked at a well regarded clinic in California, but was told by the surgeon that he would have to leave at the break due to another obligation that day. He informed me that the procedure would be complete at that point and standard procedure is for the technicians to finish by themselves, doing the actual graft insertions. The only difference would be that he would not physically be in the office as well.

I would like to commit because it works with my schedule, but I have reservations paying a lot of money for a procedure where the surgeon is only there for half of the day.

doctorisoutWith follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS), the donor area where the strip is excised is indeed closed with sutures, staples, etc., immediately after the strip is taken and before the grafts are inserted. Possibly the doctor was telling you that the techs do all of the graft placement and after they are all placed, the procedure is pretty much completed.

Still, what I don’t like is that it is always possible that the patient may need more anesthesia before the procedure is finished and only a licensed physician should be administering anesthesia. That’s the law in the land.

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