FUT (Follicular Unit Transplant)


This below question was asked by a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums and answered by recommended hair restoration surgeon Dr. Tejinder Bhatti.

How soon after a hair transplant strip removal can the scar have FUE grafts put into it? My last strip operation was in October and it’s already stretched significantly.

Also how long do you need to wait after a hair restoration surgery before doing follicular unit extraction into the previously transplanted area? I’m guessing at least 8 or 9 months to avoid planting grafts on top of previously planted ones that are still emerging.

Dr-Bhatti-photoIt takes a follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) scar 18 months to become supple. This would be the best time to fill it with FUE grafts and disguise its straight line. If done earlier, graft take is certain to be less than optimal.

In response to your second question, 6 months is a long enough wait before we can go in again for a second harvest from the same donor area. For filling up a previously planted area, 9 months is a reasonable wait period.

Best wishes.

Dr. Tejinder Bhatti

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David (TakingThePlunge)
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.
To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

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This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forum

I’m a female with a high, abnormally shaped hairline. My hairline looks more like a man’s suffering from androgenic alopecia than it does a normal female hairline. I’m not suffering from hair loss, but I do want to fix my hairline with surgery. What surgical options are available for a female with a high, abnormally shaped hairline?

hairline loweringWomen seeking surgical hairline restoration or reconstruction have two options:

The first is traditional hair transplant surgery. Hair transplantation, both via the follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) and follicular unit extraction (FUE) method, is usually a good option for female hairline reconstruction. Female patients with high or abnormal hairlines generally do not suffer from diffuse female pattern hair loss and, therefore, possess a healthy supply of available donor grafts. These grafts can safely be used to rebuild the traditional low female hairline.

The second option is surgical hairline lowering. Female hairline lowering involves removing a strip of skin between the hairline and the forehead, physically moving the hairline to a lower position, and suturing it into place. Although this procedure is generally more invasive, the results are drastic. Those interested may want to consult with recommended hair transplant surgeon Dr. Sheldon Kabaker, who specializes in hairline lowering.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

This question, asked by a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by Coalition hair restoration physician Dr. Timothy Carman:

It’s been 4 weeks since my hair transplant and my donor scar is still very red. Should I be concerned?

Dr_Carman_photoIt may just be your skin type and its healing characteristics. Really, the issue is whether it feels tender or warm to the touch.

It would be unusual to have any sort of infection or reaction this far out, unless of course your hair restoration surgeon used dissolvable sutures. If that is the case, the redness should decrease as that process resolves.

Dr. Timothy Carman

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David (TakingThePlunge)
Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Coalition Hair Loss Learning Center, and the Hair Loss Q & A Blog.

To share ideas with other hair loss sufferers visit the hair loss forum and social community.

Technorati Tags: Hair Loss, hair transplant,

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I underwent a Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) hair transplant procedure a few days ago, and I’m wondering how long it will be before the grafts are “safe” and cannot be damaged? I’m concerned about possibly damaging the grafts after I return to work (I’m an accountant).

chrisdavAccording to expert hair transplant surgeons, the newly implanted follicular unit grafts are fully anchored between post-operative day 7 and 10. This means by day 10, the grafts should be fully anchored and permanent, and no reasonable activity should damage the new follicles.

Although returning to non-physical office work should be perfectly fine, it is always best to “double check” with your clinic’s post-operative instructions. Following your doctor’s instructions after the surgery helps ensure quality results and provides useful information for any future procedures.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

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Technorati Tags: hair loss, Follicular Unit Extraction, , , hair transplant surgeons

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I’m a female hair loss sufferer. I’ve tried a variety of different medications and therapies, but nothing seems to work. I’m now considering a surgical solution and wondering if I am a candidate for hair transplantation. Can females undergo hair transplant surgery?

female hair lossYes, female patients can undergo hair transplant surgery. However, female pattern hair loss (FPHL) and androgenic alopecia (male pattern hair loss) are two very different conditions, and treating hair loss in women is often a more difficult task. Unlike male baldness, where hair sheds in patterns and leaves a viable donor region for transplantation, female hair loss is often diffuse and leaves a poor permanent donor region. This makes extraction of healthy follicular unit grafts more difficult.

Female hair loss may also be caused by a variety of complicated issues. Unlike androgenic alopecia, which is universally caused by a sensitivity to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) hormone, female hair loss can be attributed to a variety of hormonal imbalances, low blood levels, menopause, hair styling (though this is normally temporary), low iron, and other issues. Females of childbearing age are also unable to utilize finasteride (Propecia), which decreases the options for preventive medications. This means female patients must be thoroughly examined by specialized physicians (usually either endocrinologists or dermatologists) and carefully use other preventive methods before considering surgery.

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums

I recently scheduled a hair transplant procedure with a trusted surgeon. After scheduling, however, I found a bad review online. I performed a lot of research and felt comfortable with the doctor, but now I’m not sure. Should I cancel the procedure after finding a bad review of my hair transplant surgeon online?

consultationIf you search hard enough, you will likely find “dirt” on every hair transplant surgeon practicing today. Not only is it difficult to verify this information, especially when it comes from unfamiliar sources, but no surgeon “bats a thousand” and all doctors have a few bad cases. 

However, conducting thorough research and choosing a surgeon who has been carefully reviewed and approved by experts and patients alike usually helps ensure quality work. Recommended hair transplant surgeons boast impressive track records and most patients come to the same conclusion during their research. Stress before a hair transplant procedure is definitely understandable, and online feedback should not be automatically dismissed. However, performing diligent research and consulting with proven, trusted physicians usually helps lead to positive outcomes and impressive results! 
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: hair loss, hair transplant,

This question, from a member of our Hair Loss Social Community and Discussion Forums, was answered by Dr. Jerry Cooley of Charlotte, NC who is a member of the Coalition of Independent Hair Restoration Physicians.

Dr. Cooley, I had follicular unit strip surgery (FUSS) with you back in April, and at that time, I said I wanted to get as much as I could as I hoped it would be the last one I would do (because I really don’t know how much more could be done, given the two 500 graft procedures I had back in the 1990’s). If at some point in the future I wanted one more procedure, would you recommend follicular unit extraction (FUE) or another strip hair transplant for my situation?

image_cooleyGreat question! In my practice, helping a patient decide on FUE vs FUSS involves weighing several factors. Most of my patients wear medium length hair and place a premium on being able to get back to work in a week and, since we generally don’t shave donor or recipient, this is very realistic.

If my patient wears their hair very short anyway and wants to avoid any chance of a noticeable linear scar, then FUE is the best bet. For someone who has had prior procedures, scalp laxity is a big factor. Minimal scalp laxity may push us toward FUE. On the other hand, if you healed well from the last procedure and have decent remaining laxity, another strip procedure would be the way to go.

Dr Wu BetterOnly physicians with a proven record of producing excellent hair transplant results are approved for recommendation at the Hair Transplant Network. After thorough review, we are pleased to announce that Dr. Wen-Yi Wu of Taipei, Taiwan has been approved for recommendation on the Hair Transplant Network. To learn how we pre-screen and recommend hair transplant surgeons, click here.

Dr. Wu, his technique and results were carefully reviewed by our hair restoration forum and social community in consideration for recommendation. The majority of the feedback we received regarding his potential inclusion has been highly supportive. To see what our members are saying, visit the Potential Recommendation of Dr. Wen-Yi Wu of Taipei, Taiwan.

Given the positive feedback we received from patients, physicians and forum members and his dedication to state of the art FUT (Follicular Unit Strip Sugery or FUSS) and Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE) hair transplant surgery, Dr. Wu has been approved for recommendation on the Hair Transplant Network. To view Dr. Wu’s recommendation profile, click here.

Thanks to everyone who provided their valuable input regarding Dr. Wu’s potential recommendation. You are encouraged to congratulate him by clicking on his featured potential inclusion topic above. 

For hair loss sufferers considering hair transplant surgery in Taiwan and beyond, we strongly encourage you to consult with and consider Dr. Wen-Yi Wu for your procedure.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I recently consulted with a hair transplant surgeon who recommended the use of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) during the procedure. Is this useful? How is PRP generally used? Does PRP actually increase the yield or growth of a hair transplant procedure?

PRPRecently, more hair transplant surgeons have begun utilizing PRP in surgery. The physicians using PRP during hair transplants do so in two different ways:

1.) By treating the recipient area with PRP prior to (or during) graft insertion. 

2.) Using PRP (or platelet poor plasma – PPP) as a follicular unit graft storage medium.

These physicians believe the use of PRP helps improve yield, decreases healing time, and helps grafts stay healthy while outside the body. However, this has not been thoroughly researched and all evidence is anecdotal at this point in time. 

Those seeking more information may be interested in the following article: Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP): An Important Role in Hair Transplant Surgery? Hopefully it provides some additional information.
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

Center, the Hair Loss Q&A Blog, and the Hair Restoration Forum

Follow our community on Twitter

Watch hair transplant videos on YouTube

Technorati Tags: hair loss, , , , hair transplant

This question comes from a member of our hair loss social community and discussion forums:

I’m researching surgery and noticing that most clinics use hair transplant technicians for the placement of the follicular unit grafts. Is this standard practice? Is it okay for technicians to place grafts during hair transplant surgery?

graft placement techsIn my opinion, hair transplant technicians are highly proficient at their jobs. In fact, all top-notch clinics understand that hair transplant surgery is a team effort, and the doctors managing these clinics train, review, and retain the best technicians. While many doctors certainly assist in the placement process, I really think the majority of this work will always fall on the technicians. Which, again, I believe falls under their job description and they are more than capable of handling.

In fact, quality clinics employee technicians who have placed thousands upon thousands of grafts and are likely the most qualified to do so. This is akin to the manner in which a trained doctor is the most qualified to remove the grafts and make the incision sites. Altogether, technicians placing grafts at trusted, reviewed clinics is, in my opinion, standard practice. Keep in mind that this doesn’t take placement with an implanter pen (like the Choi and Lion implanter pen) into consideration (which still involves technicians priming the pen for the doctor).
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Blake – aka Future_HT_Doc

Editorial Assistant and Forum Co-Moderator for the Hair Transplant Network, the Hair Loss Learning

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